Acupuncture and East Asian Medicine In shoreline, WA

Welcome to the practice of George Whiteside MS, EAMP

Since 1992, George Whiteside, MS, EAMP has helped patients return to an active and energized life, naturally.  George now offers the full spectrum of techniques within the system of East Asian Medicine (EAM).  EAM is a holistic body of medicine theory applied through many modalities including Acupuncture, Massage, Health Education, Botanical Medicine and more.

East Asian Medicine

EAM is founded on the idea that good health depends on maintaining the proper balance of systems throughout the body.  With the stresses of our modern lives, it is often challenging to maintain balance.  The many techniques employed within this system are used to correct imbalances, encouraging the body to return to full health and well being naturally.  While this medicine is best known in the US for treating pain, it has been used traditionally to help with ailments of all kinds.  After a thorough initial intake, George provides the combination of therapies that will best suit your goals.

Physical Aspects of The Heart

In Traditional Chinese Medicine, the heart is the organ most closely linked to emotion. Think about all the terms we use every day to describe our state of mind: “heartsick,” “heartbroken,” “heartache” The heart is not the director of subtlety; the emotions it encompasses seem to always be on the far end of the spectrum, either extreme sadness or extreme

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Auricular Acupuncture

Traditional Chinese Medicine is a medical system that dates back nearly 4,000 years. Auricular acupuncture was first mentioned around 500 B.C. in the Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine, which is the equivalent of the Bible for TCM practitioners. However, the method in which auricular acupuncture is practiced today is actually based upon discoveries that occurred in France in

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Why am I so cold?

Everyone feels cold sometimes, but some people are perpetually chilled to a point where it interferes with their lives.

From a Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective, there are two different kinds of cold in the body: full cold and empty cold. Full cold refers to a condition where there is an excess of cold-type energy in the body

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